Category Archives: IR Theory

Lexicon Pamphlet Series: Downloadable PDFs! | Outside the Circle

 

Some great free stuff here, from the Institute for Anarchist Studies.

Lexicon Pamphlet Series: Downloadable PDFs! | Outside the Circle.

Issue 5 Imperialism, Finance, #Occupy 2012 | Journal of Critical Globalisation Studies

Announcing the publication of Issue 5 of the Journal of Critical Globalization Studies featuring, amongst other things, a large Occupy IR forum on the Occupy Wall Street movement and its relevance for International Relations and International Political Economy. The forum contains short comment pieces from Patrick Thaddeus Jackson, Elizabeth Cobbett with Randall Germain, Ian Bruff, Elisabeth Chaves, Wanda Vrasti, Michael J. Shapiro, Nicole Sunday Hughes, Simon Tormey, David J. Bailey, Agnes Gagyi, Aida A. Hozic, Ivan Manokha with Mona Chalabi, Nicholas J. Kiersey, and Colin Wight. The issue also includes an extended contribution on the Occupy movement in Canada by Konstantin Kilibarda.

Issue 5 Imperialism, Finance, #Occupy 2012 | Journal of Critical Globalisation Studies.

#OCCUPYIRTHEORY @ ISA2012, San Diego

ISA Headquarters have kindly granted the use of a room for a special #occupyirtheory meeting at the upcoming Annual Convention, in San Diego, April 1-4, 2012.

The meeting will be listed on the official online version of the schedule as #OCCUPYIRTHEORY? Lessons from OWS for the Study of World Politics. It will be held at at the Hilton Bayfront Hotel on Tuesday, April 3 from 6:30 to 9:30 pm.

The event will open with a brief roundtable with various speakers (TBA) addressing a diversity of themes related to IR, IPE, and OWS. It is hoped we will have some local Occupy San Diego activists present to offer their thoughts, too. This will be followed by a GA-style event where audience members will be welcome to engage in informal discussion on strategies and initiatives that the movement might chose to pursue.

There will also be an informal strategy meeting on Sunday night for anyone interested in helping out with running the event.

If you are interested in playing a role in organizing this, or you just have any questions or concerns, feel welcome to email us at occupyirtheory *AT* gmail *DOT* com, or contact one of the group members on Facebook.

Thanks everyone!

#occupyirtheory

TRIP, Wendt, and IR’s Disorder

So, here we have an excerpt from OSU’s Mershon newsletter – which is a nice way to introduce the below excerpt from the Disorder of Things blog…

In a survey of faculty at more than 1,400 colleges and universities worldwide, Alexander Wendt was named as having the most influence in the field of international relations over the past 20 years. Wendt is Ralph D. Mershon Professor of International Security.The survey was part of the Teaching, Research, and International Policy TRIP Project done by the Theory and Practice of International Relations at the College of William and Mary. This is the projects fourth survey since 2004.Wendt was also named for producing the best work in the field of international relations over the past 20 years, and third for producing the most interesting scholarship over the past five years.Wendt is author of Social Theory of International Politics Cambridge, 1999, widely cited for bringing social constructivist theory to the field of international relations. His book argues that international politics is determined not primarily by material concerns such as wealth and power, but by states perceptions of each other as rivals, enemies, and friends. Social Theory of International Politics was named Best Book of the Decade by the International Studies Association in 2006 and has been translated into 10 languages.Wendt is also co-editor, with Duncan Snidal, of International Theory: A Journal of International Politics, Law and Philosophy. His recent publications include New Systems Theories of World Politics Palgrave, 2009, edited with Mathias Albert and Lars-Erik Cederman. Based on a 2005 Mershon Center conference, the book uses a number of systems theoretical approaches to analyze the structure and dynamics of the international system. Wendt’s contribution, “Flatland: Quantum Mind and the International System,” compares the international system to a hologram.

via Mershon Memo.

And now a quote from this excellent Disorder of Things commentary:

The self-image of the discipline continues to shift within the American heartland, not least with respect to the Big Other of Realism. The 2009 TRIP Survey recorded the percentage of self-identified Realists among US respondents at 21%, with Liberals at 20% and Constructivists at 17%. Things have progressed some way since then, with only just over 16% now willing to call themselves Realist against a steady 20% of Liberals and a narrowly triumphant 20.4% of Constructivists (and given the rankings awarded to Wendt within the ‘top four scholars’ sections, the shorter TRIPS may be rendered more simply as: ALEXANDER WENDT MADE ME A CONSTRUCTIVIST). Agnostics and Refuseniks together continue to outnumber these main categories with 11.5% naming themselves ‘Other’ and a further 25.7% declining to name any paradigmatic preference (a slight increase, but essentially the same levels as in 2008).

Read more here…